3 Ways To Handle Anger Effectively in a Relationship


Anger on typewriter
Effective anger managment

When our partner gets angry with us our immediate response may be to get defensive. However this creates a cycle of defence and attack that can leave us exhausted and none the wiser. Here are some tips from relationship expert Kyle Benson on how to handle your partner’s anger and ultimately become closer through it.


1. Don’t take it personally

Your partner’s anger is usually not about you. It’s about their underlying primary feelings. Not taking this personally takes a high level of emotional intelligence. One of the ways I do this is by becoming curious of why they’re angry. It’s much easier for me to become defensive, but I’ve found thinking, “Wow, this person is angry, why is that?” leads me on a journey to seeing the raw emotions they are protecting and actually brings us closer together.


2. Don’t EVER tell your partner to “calm down”

When I work with couples and one of the partners get angry, I have witnessed the other partner say, “Calm down” or “You’re overreacting.” This tells the recipient that their feelings don’t matter and they are not acceptable.

The goal here is not to change or fix your partner’s emotions but rather to sit on their anger iceberg with them. Communicate that you understand and accept their feelings.

When you do this well, your partner’s anger will subside and the primary emotion will rise to the surface. Not to mention they will feel heard by you, which builds trust over time.

Maybe you grew up in a family where anger wasn’t allowed, so when your partner expresses it, it feels paralysing and you freeze. Or maybe you try to solve their anger for them because their anger scares you. Open yourself up to experience you and your partner’s full spectrum of emotions.


3. Identify the obstacle

Anger is often caused by an obstacle blocking a goal. For example, if your partner’s goal is to feel special on their birthday and their family member missing their special day makes them angry, identifying the obstacle will give you insight into why they’re angry.

The bottom line is that people feel angry for a reason. It’s your job to understand and sit with them in it. By doing so, you will not only help them to understand their anger, but you will become closer to them in the process.

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